Category: Accounting and Auditing

New PCAOB guidance on auditor communications regarding CAMs

The PCAOB has just published new guidance on auditors’ communication of critical audit matters in the auditor’s report.  The guidance includes some new FAQs related to how auditors should describe their principal considerations in determining CAMs, how they should describe audit procedures and the outcome of audit procedures, as well as the relationship between CAMs and company disclosures and the treatment of recurring CAMs.  While the FAQs are intended for auditors, they can provide some insight for company management into the process and the resulting auditor communications.

SEC proposes narrow carve-out to exempt low-revenue smaller reporting companies from the SOX 404(b) auditor attestation requirement (UPDATED)

[This post has been updated primarily to reflect the contents of the proposing release as well as the statement of Commissioner Hester Peirce.]

Those of you who expected the SEC to go big and propose raising the current threshold for status as an “accelerated filer” to be commensurate with the cap for “smaller reporting companies” will be sorely disappointed, as will anyone looking for regulatory simplification and harmonization. Nevertheless, the SEC did address the big elephant in the room—the SOX 404(b) auditor attestation requirement—with a measured, narrowly tailored exception that attempted to thread the needle with regard to the controversy over exempting additional companies from SOX 404(b), viewed by some as a critical investor protection. However, the resulting framework proposed for determining filer categories and requirements adds another layer of complexity to the current labyrinth, including some rather head-spinning new transition provisions. Will anyone—other than low-revenue smaller reporting companies—be happy with the result?

SEC proposes narrow carve-out to allow low-revenue smaller reporting companies to avoid SOX 404(b) auditor attestation requirement

Those of you who expected the SEC to go big and propose raising the current threshold for status as an “accelerated filer” to be commensurate with the cap for “smaller reporting companies” will be sorely disappointed. Nevertheless, the SEC did address the big elephant in the room—SOX 404(b)—with a narrowly tailored exception.

At an open meeting this morning, the SEC voted (by a vote of three to two, with Commissioner Robert Jackson dissenting) to propose amendments to the accelerated filer and large accelerated filer definitions that provide a narrow carve-out from these  definitions for companies that qualify as smaller reporting companies and reported less than $100 million in annual revenues in the most recent fiscal year for which audited financial statements were available. As a result, if the proposal were adopted, those companies would no longer need to comply with the shorter timeframes applicable to accelerated filers and large accelerated filers for filing periodic reports.  And, most significantly, the proposed revision would mean that those companies qualifying for the carve-out would no longer be subject to the SOX 404(b) auditor attestation requirement, which has been anathema to many deregulation advocates.  Notably, companies with a public float between $75 million and $250 million would still be subject to the accelerated filer requirements unless their revenues were under the $100 million revenue cap. The proposal, which has not yet been posted, would also increase from $50 million to $60 million the transition thresholds for accelerated and large accelerated filers to become a non-accelerated filer and increase the threshold for exiting large accelerated filer status from $500 million to $560 million.  In addition, the proposal would add a revenue test to the transition thresholds for exiting both accelerated and large accelerated filer status.  (Here is the press release.) There is a 60-day comment period. (The proposing release has just now been posted. Check this space for updates.)

What happened at the Small Business Capital Formation roundtable and Advisory Committee meeting?

This is National Small Business Week and, to kick things off, the SEC today held a brief roundtable featuring representatives of small business and investment funds in a discussion of the challenges of raising funding outside of the four key tech hotspots (San Francisco, San Jose, Boston and NYC) as well as other challenges associated with public company status as a small business.  After the roundtable, the SEC’s Small Business Capital Formation Advisory Committee held its inaugural meeting.  At the meeting, Corp Fin Director Bill Hinman discussed the SEC’s agenda (including the upcoming proposal that could limit the application of the SOX 404(b) auditor attestation requirement).

SEC proposes amendments to financial disclosures in M&A

his morning, once again without an open meeting—whatever happened to government in the sunshine?—the SEC  voted to propose amendments intended to improve the disclosure requirements for financial statements relating to acquisitions and dispositions of businesses.  According to the press release, the proposed changes are designed to “improve for investors the financial information about acquired and disposed businesses; facilitate more timely access to capital; and reduce the complexity and cost to prepare the disclosure.”  The proposal will be open for public comment for 60 days.

CAMs may be coming, but in the EU, KAMs have already arrived

As you may recall, auditors of large accelerated filers will be required to report on CAMs—critical audit matters—in their auditor’s reports for fiscal years ending on or after June 30, 2019 and in auditor’s reports for all other companies (except EGCs) to which the requirements apply for fiscal years ending on or after December 15, 2020. (See this PubCo post.) As SEC Commissioner Kara Stein observed in her statement on approval of the new rule, the new “standard marks the first significant change to the auditor’s report in more than 70 years.”  In Europe, a similar concept has been in operation since 2016: “key audit matters.” What has been the experience so far?

PCAOB provides guidance on CAMs

Coming soon to a financial statement near you: CAMs!  Late this summer, in audit reports for large accelerated filers with June 30 fiscal year ends, auditors will begin to disclose “critical audit matters.”  Under the new auditing standard for the auditor’s report (AS 3101), CAMs are defined as “matters communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements; and (2) involved especially challenging, subjective, or complex auditor judgment.” Essentially, the concept is intended to capture the matters that kept the auditor up at night, so long as they meet the standard’s criteria.  Compliance will be required for audits of large accelerated filers for fiscal years ending on or after June 30, 2019, and for audits of all other companies to which the requirement apply (not EGCs) for fiscal years ending on or after December 15, 2020.  With that in mind,  the PCAOB has released three new documents offering guidance on CAM implementation: The Basics; A Deeper Dive on the Determination of CAMs; and Staff Observations from Review of Audit Methodologies.  (See also thecorporatecounsel.net blog and this article in ComplianceWeek.)