Tag: board gender diversity

Is “stale” a big reason for “male and pale” boards?

Here is the lede from this WSJ article: “A stubborn paradox reigns across U.S. boardrooms: Companies are appointing more women to board seats than ever, yet the overall share of female directors is barely budging.” In comments to the WSJ, the managing director for corporate governance research at the Conference Board indicated that, in “the last two decades, there’s been a sweeping revolution in the field of corporate governance…. Yet if you look at the composition of the board, at its core, it remains the same at many public companies and quite resistant to change.’” Why is that?  It’s not, as some have suggested, a lack of qualified women board candidates.  Rather, according to the Conference Board, it’s that “average director tenure continues to be quite extensive (at 10 years or longer), board seats rarely become vacant and, when a spot is available, it is often taken by a seasoned director rather than a newcomer with no prior board experience.”

California’s board gender diversity mandate: will it matter?

As discussed in this article in Bloomberg Businessweek, a new analysis conducted by Bloomberg explores the potential impact of California’s new board gender diversity mandate, SB 826.  And what does it show?  The impact on  the composition of boards could be substantial—perhaps even a “sea change.” 

ISS posts 2019 policy updates

Yesterday, ISS announced updates to its policies for next year.  Like Glass Lewis a month ago, ISS is also—shall we say “unfriendly”— to boards of companies that submit to shareholders a charter or bylaw ratification proposal while excluding, as permitted under SEC rules and staff no-action positions, a conflicting shareholder proposal.  Below are some of the highlights of the ISS updates:

Low board turnover? Less opportunity for board diversity

Is board stability always a good thing? A new study from consultant Spencer Stuart showed that, in 2018, 428 new directors were elected to boards of companies in the S&P 500, the most new directors since 2004, representing an increase of 8% from 2017.  What’s more, 57% of boards added at least one new director, and 22% appointed more than one new director. However, overall turnover remained “modest.” While these new directors added  “fresh skills, qualifications and perspectives”—and many were women, minorities and/or first-time directors—nevertheless, the study concludes, “progress is mixed.”

Glass Lewis posts 2019 proxy and shareholder initiative guidelines

Proxy advisor Glass Lewis has posted its 2019 Proxy Guidelines and 2019 Guidelines Regarding Shareholder Initiatives.  One of the more striking points is that GL indicates that it may, albeit in limited circumstances, recommend against the members of the nominating/governance committee simply for successfully requesting no-action relief from the SEC to exclude (and presumably excluding) a shareholder proposal, where GL views the exclusion to have been detrimental to shareholders. GL’s new guidance includes the following updates:

California mandates quotas for board gender diversity—will it fuel a movement?

As discussed in this PubCo post from February, a California bill, SB 826, addressing the issue of board gender diversity,  has been making its way through the California legislature. On Sunday, Governor Jerry Brown signed that bill into law.  Interestingly, one factor apparently influential in his decision to sign the bill was the recent hearing in Washington. As you may have heard, the legislation requires, as Brown phrases it, a “representative number” of women on boards of public companies, including foreign corporations with principal executive offices located in California. Will other states now follow suit?  Will corporations incorporated in other states observe its provisions or challenge the application of this California law?

ISS reveals results of most recent Governance Principles Survey

ISS has posted the results of its most recent Governance Principles Survey,  which can sometimes guide future ISS policies. The key areas of focus were auditors and audit committees, director accountability and track records, board gender diversity and the principle of one-share one-vote.