Tag Archives: shareholder proposals

Will the House now try to undo SOX?

by Cydney Posner

What’s next for the House after taking on Dodd-Frank in the Financial CHOICE Act? Apparently, it’s time to revisit SOX. The Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Securities, and Investment of the House Financial Services Committee held a hearing earlier this week entitled “The Cost of Being a Public Company in Light of Sarbanes-Oxley and the Federalization of Corporate Governance.” During the hearing, all subcommittee members continued bemoaning the decline in IPOs and in public companies, with the majority of the subcommittee attributing the decline largely to regulatory overload.  A number of the witnesses trained their sights on, among other things, the internal control auditor attestation requirement of SOX 404(b).   Is auditor attestation, for all but the very largest companies, about to hit the dust? Continue reading

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ExxonMobil shareholders approve climate change proposal — are shareholder proposals on climate change becoming a thing?

by Cydney Posner

Are we witnessing the beginning of a new trend?  The history of shareholder proposals to enhance disclosure regarding climate change has been a dismal one. But suddenly, this proxy season, we have climate change proposals succeeding at two — and, as of today, three — major companies. Is this the start of something big? Continue reading

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It’s baaaack — the Financial CHOICE Act of 2017

by Cydney Posner

A draft of the Financial CHOICE Act of 2017 (fka version 2.0), a bill to create hope and opportunity for investors, consumers, and entrepreneurs — a masterpiece of acronyming — has just been released (and weighs in at 593 pages).   The bill, sponsored by Jeb Hensarling, Chair of the House Financial Services Committee, was framed as a Republican proposal to reform the financial regulatory system and relieve the affliction of Dodd-Frank. In addition to taking aim at much of Dodd-Frank, among other things, the bill places a heavier burden on regulators and proxy advisory firms generally, eliminates a lot of studies and repeals or eases a number of regulations. A hearing in the House has been scheduled for this week. The bill never made much progress when it was originally introduced last year (as version 1.0), but with Congress and the Presidency now in Republican hands, its chances of survival in some form are immensely greater.  Of course, the Senate Dems could filibuster — assuming, that is, that the legislative filibuster survives that long — the Senate version of the bill, or threaten to do so, which could lead to some negotiation.

While the vast majority of provisions in the draft bill relate to the banking provisions of Dodd-Frank and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, some are related to new requirements for agency rulemaking, capital formation, compensation and corporate governance matters, and other matters of interest. Selected provisions are summarized below: Continue reading

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Filed under Accounting and Auditing, Corporate Governance, Executive Compensation, Litigation, Securities

Shareholder proposal process in the crosshairs

by Cydney Posner

According to this report in Bloomberg BNA,  the plans for changing the shareholder proposal process in the Financial CHOICE Act 2.0 are quite dramatic and could effectively curtail the process, if that is, the current version of the provision ever makes it into law.   Continue reading

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More opposition to the virtual-only annual meeting

by Cydney Posner

In case you missed it, Gretchen Morgenson’s column in the Sunday NYT railed against virtual-only annual meetings, which according to her data (provided by Broadridge), have increased in number from 21 in 2011 to 154 in 2016.  And joining in the condemnation of the practice was NYC Comptroller Scott Stringer, who, you may recall, submitted 75 shareholder proposals for proxy access at major companies in 2014, triggering the movement toward wider adoption of proxy access bylaws.  Interestingly, the virtual annual meeting was initially viewed as “CPR” for the debilitated annual shareholders’ meeting, which had, over time, evolved into a moribund ritual of corporate governance, as fewer and fewer shareholders were able or willing to overcome the logistical and financial burdens of attendance in person. With virtual technology, large numbers of shareholders were suddenly able to attend meetings on their laptops. Ironically, however, it is shareholders — the designated beneficiaries of the virtual annual meeting — that have raised objections. Continue reading

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SEC continues to grant no-action relief in connection with proxy access fix-it proposals

by Cydney Posner

The SEC has posted a number of additional Corp Fin responses to requests for no-action, as well as to requests for reconsideration of previous denials of relief, regarding shareholder proposals to amend proxy access bylaws, so-called “fix-it” proposals. In all cases, the companies argued that they should be permitted to exclude the fix-it proposals as “substantially implemented” under Rule 14a-8(i)(10). The requests were successful in obtaining no-action relief in all cases except one. As in the past, the staff has not identified the key determining factor, but companies now seem to have found a formula for successfully excluding these proposals. Continue reading

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Another theory on Corp Fin’s position on proxy access fix-it proposals

by Cydney Posner

Corp Fin has refined its position with regard to exclusion of proposals to amend existing proxy access bylaws.  However, the basis for the staff’s determination to grant or refuse no-action relief in that context remains a conundrum.
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