Tag: CEO pay

How does the public view executive comp?

How many people have strong opinions about most hot topics in corporate governance— staggered boards, proxy advisory firms or dual-class share structure? In Pay for Performance… But Not Too Much Pay: The American Public’s View of CEO Pay, from the Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford, the authors take a look at a corporate governance subject on which everyone seems to have an opinion—CEO pay—and the public’s perceptions about it.  While academics may be arguing about labor market efficiency, much of the public takes a more intuitive or pragmatic approach: “the issue of CEO pay boils down to a personal assessment of whether any executive deserves to be paid so much money.” The authors’ conclusion from the survey:  “the disconnect between observed pay levels and the public’s view of pay is stark.”  Overall, the survey results were quite fascinating.

The unintended consequences of say on pay

by Cydney Posner This post from the Columbia Law School CLS Blue Sky blog, “Should Say-on-Pay Votes Be Binding?,”  by two executives from the Institute for Governance of Private and Public Organizations  in Canada, in exploring the issue raised in the post’s title, looks at the question of the effectiveness and […]

It’s back to square one: pay CEOs with short-term incentives?

by Cydney Posner How to structure executive pay to drive performance over the long term—while avoiding pay levels that would be considered excessive—is a conundrum for compensation committees, consultants, proxy advisory firms and others involved in setting or analyzing executive compensation. And the analysis has only become more complex since […]

Do women directors promote higher CEO pay?

by Cydney Posner As reported on Sunday in this NYT column by Gretchen Morgenson, recent data shows that boards with more gender diversity pay higher compensation to their CEOs.  An Equilar analysis of CEO pay at 100 large companies “found that companies with greater gender diversity on their boards paid their chief executives […]