Tag: corporate political spending disclosure

House budget package would scrap proxy advisor rules

It’s worth noting that the minibus budget package passed by the House last week includes a provision intended to put the kibosh on the proxy advisory firm rules that were adopted by the SEC in July 2020. Specifically, the bill provides that “[n]one of the funds made available by this Act may be used to implement the amendments to sections 240.14a-1(l), 240.14a–2, or 240.14a-9 of title 17, Code of Federal Regulations, that were adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 22, 2020.” Of course, Corp Fin had already put a temporary halt on enforcement of those rules.   And unlike prior years, there is no provision in the House bill—yet—that would prohibit the SEC from using any of the funds to finalize rules requiring disclosure of corporate political spending. The bill next goes to the Senate, where, of course, there could be substantial changes.

Senators introduce bill to mandate political spending disclosure and shareholder authorization

The events of January 6 heightened sensitivity to any dissonance or conflict between a company’s public statements or announced core values and its political contributions.  In the aftermath, a number of companies determined to pause or discontinue some or all political donations, but the clamor for disclosure regarding corporate political spending has continued. To that end, Senators Chris Van Hollen and Robert Menendez have reintroduced the Shareholder Protection Act of 2021 to mandate not only political spending disclosure, but also shareholder votes to authorize corporate political spending. According to the press release, “[s]ome public companies’ decision to suspend or reevaluate further political donations is an acknowledgment that political donations can significantly affect a company’s reputation and financial health. Without public disclosure of political contributions, shareholders are left in the dark about decisions that may affect a company’s bottom-line, and in the case of the January 6th insurrection, decisions to support organizations and campaigns that may have advocated stopping the certification of a free and fair election.”

Tug-of-war over shareholder proposals for lobbying disclosure

Just like the 2017 Consolidated Appropriations Act, the 2018 Consolidated Appropriations Act expressly precluded the use of any of the appropriated funds for issuance or implementation by the SEC of any rule regarding the disclosure of political contributions, contributions to tax exempt organizations or dues paid to trade associations. Not that political spending/corporate lobbying disclosure rules were a hot prospect at the SEC these days anyway.  So what’s a political spending/lobbying disclosure true believer to do? Shareholder proposals, of course.  After all, private ordering seemed to work for proxy access. And now it seems like everyone is getting into the act.

Deregulation? What deregulation? Two (persistent) campaigns for enhanced disclosure requirements

Notwithstanding the deregulatory emphasis of the current administration, two campaigns are currently being waged to convince the SEC to adopt new regulations mandating more disclosure—one related to human capital management and the other related to a frequent target, corporate political spending. Are these just pipe dreams? Is it time for a reality check? Or might there be some basis for believing that this SEC might act on these requests?

Court dismisses case to compel SEC to act on rulemaking petition for corporate political spending disclosure

by Cydney Posner As noted in Law360,  a DC District Court has granted the SEC’s motion to dismiss a complaint filed to compel the SEC to act on a rulemaking petition regarding corporate political spending disclosure.  Of course, as discussed in this PubCo post, a provision prohibiting the SEC from […]