Tag: Inline XBRL

Is XBRL already obsolete?

You’ve got to just love the irony: the SEC’s amendments mandating the use of Inline XBRL aren’t even effective yet, and experts at an accounting conference have declared XBRL “nearly useless as an investment tool,” and “all but unnecessary.”

Cooley Alert: SEC Adopts Mandatory Inline XBRL

For some riveting nighttime reading, you might want to take a look at our Cooley Alert, SEC Adopts Mandatory Inline XBRL.  I’m sure you’ll find it both suspenseful and moving! 

SEC adopts mandatory Inline XBRL

This morning, the SEC voted (by a vote of four to one) to adopt rules mandating the use of Inline XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language) for the submission of financial statement information for operating companies. The rulemaking is part of the SEC’s disclosure modernization initiative. For the most part, the Commissioners showed a lot more enthusiasm for this proposal than for the changes to the definition of  “smaller reporting company” also adopted earlier today.  (See this PubCo post.)

SEC to vote next week on raising the public float cap for smaller reporting companies and mandatory Inline XBRL

The SEC has noticed an open meeting for next week.  Among the matters on the agenda:

whether to adopt amendments to the definition of “smaller reporting company” and other rules and forms in light of the new definition; and
whether to adopt amendments requiring the use of the Inline XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language) for the submission of financial statement information.

What’s on the Agenda—the SEC’s Regulatory Flexibility Agenda, that is?

SEC Chair Jay Clayton has repeatedly made a point of his intent to take the Regulatory Flexibility Act Agenda ”seriously,” streamlining it to show what the SEC actually expected to take up in the subsequent period. (See this PubCo post and this PubCo post.)  The agenda has just been released, and it certainly appears that Clayton has been true to his word: several items that had taken up long-term residency on numerous prior agendas seem to be absent from this one.

SEC proposes FAST Act Modernization and Simplification of Regulation S-K

The SEC has now posted its release regarding FAST Act Modernization and Simplification of Regulation S-K, which proposes amendments to rules and forms based primarily on the staff’s recommendations in its Report to Congress on Modernization and Simplification of Regulation S-K (required by the FAST Act).  (See this PubCo post.) That Report, in turn, was premised on the review that the SEC conducted as part of its Disclosure Effectiveness Initiative and the related Concept Release, which addressed a broader range of potential changes.  (See this PubCo post and this PubCo post.)  A new approach to confidential treatment, not addressed in the Report, is also proposed.  As indicated by the title, the proposed amendments are intended to modernize and simplify a number of disclosure requirements in Reg S-K, and related rules and forms, in a way that reduces the compliance and cost burdens on companies while continuing to provide effective disclosure for investors, including improvements designed to make the disclosures more readable, less repetitive and more easily navigable.

What’s happening with those SEC proposals for Dodd-Frank clawbacks and disclosure of pay for performance and hedging? Apparently, not much.

As noted in this article from Law360, the SEC’s latest Regulatory Flexibility Agenda, which identifies those regs that the SEC intends to propose or adopt in the coming year— and those deferred for a later time—has now been posted.  The Agenda shifts to the category of long-term actions most of the Dodd-Frank compensation-related items that had previously been on the short-term agenda—not really a big surprise given the deregulatory bent of the new administration.  Keep in mind, however, that the Agenda has no binding effect and, in this case, could be even less prophetic than usual; the Preamble to the SEC’s Agenda indicates that it reflects “only the priorities of the Acting Chairman [Michael Piwowar], and [does] not necessarily reflect the view and priorities of any individual Commissioner.”  It also indicates that information in the Agenda was accurate as of March 29, 2017.  As a result, it does not necessarily reflect the views of the new SEC Chair, Jay Clayton, who was not confirmed in that post until May.