Tag: SEC Commissioner Elad Roisman

Commissioner Roisman asks: Is the SEC the right agency for rulemaking about ESG disclosure?

In a recent speech, SEC Chair Gary Gensler conveyed a sense of full steam ahead with regard to mandatory disclosure requirements about climate and human capital. (See this PubCo post.) The day before, Commissioner Elad Roisman also addressed potential ESG disclosure requirements, but from quite a different perspective—concern. While he understands that there is a demand for consistent standardized ESG disclosure, especially about climate, is it premature to attempt to standardize, he wonders? To what extent does the SEC have a legislative mandate to construct ESG disclosure rules? And how is the SEC—a bunch of lawyers and accountants and economists—ever going to craft and oversee ESG regulation effectively?   When you get down to it, his question is this: Is the SEC the right agency for rulemaking about ESG (particularly climate) disclosure?

Peirce and Roisman object to SEC’s new agenda

Even the SEC’s new Reg Flex Agenda (which reflect the priorities of the SEC Chair) has now elicited a “dissent” from the two SEC Commissioners on the other side of the political aisle.  In this statement, posted yesterday, Commissioners Hester Peirce and Elad Roisman lambast the new Spring 2021 Agenda for “the regrettable decision to spend our scarce resources to undo a number of rules the Commission just adopted.” While the Agenda contains several “important and timely items”—which they identify as rules related to transfer agents and government securities alternative trading systems—the absence of other items was notable, including important rulemakings that would “provide clarity for digital assets, allow companies to compensate gig workers with equity, and revisit proxy plumbing.” (Of course, two of those rulemakings were not entirely absent, but have instead been moved to the long-term agenda.  See this PubCo post.) Perhaps, they suggest, too much attention to undoing existing rules rather than creating new ones? 

Commissioner Roisman suggests ways to reduce the costs of ESG disclosure

In remarks yesterday before the ESG Board Forum, Putting the Electric Cart before the Horse: Addressing Inevitable Costs of a New ESG Disclosure Regime, SEC Commissioner Elad Roisman weighed in with his views on mandatory prescriptive ESG requirements and the likely associated costs.  As he has indicated before, he’s not really keen on the idea, particularly the environmental and social components of potential requirements.  As a general matter, while investors want to see comparable standardized environmental data, in his view, standardization of that type of information is really hard to do; some of it “is inherently imprecise, relies on underlying assumptions that continually evolve, and can be reasonably calculated in different ways.  And ultimately, unless this information can meaningfully inform an investment decision, it is at best not useful and at worst misleading.” But, if a new regulatory regime requiring ESG disclosure is adopted—and it certainly looks that way— he has some ideas for ways to make it less costly for companies to comply.

Commissioners Peirce and Roisman criticize “unduly broad view” of “internal accounting controls” in Andeavor

In October, the SEC settled charges against Andeavor, an energy company formerly traded on the NYSE and now wholly owned by Marathon Petroleum, in connection with stock repurchases authorized by its board in 2015 and 2016. (See this PubCo post.) Pursuant to that authorization, in 2018, Andeavor’s CEO had directed the legal department to establish a Rule 10b5-1 plan to repurchase company shares worth $250 million. At the time, however, Andeavor’s CEO was on the verge of meeting with the CEO of Marathon Petroleum to resume previously stalled negotiations on an acquisition of Andeavor at a substantial premium. After Andeavor’s legal department concluded that the company did not possess material nonpublic information about the acquisition, Andeavor went ahead with the stock repurchase. Rather than attempting to build a 10b-5 case based on a debatably defective 10b5-1 plan, the SEC opted instead to make its point with allegations that Andeavor had failed to maintain an effective system of internal control procedures in violation of Exchange Act Section 13(b)(2)(B). On Friday, the SEC posted the joint statement of SEC Commissioners Hester Peirce and Elad Roisman, who voted against the settled action, explaining the reasons for their dissents. In sum, they contend that, in the action, the SEC took an “unduly broad view of Section 13(b)(2)(B).”