Tag: SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce

Commissioners Peirce and Roisman criticize “unduly broad view” of “internal accounting controls” in Andeavor

In October, the SEC settled charges against Andeavor, an energy company formerly traded on the NYSE and now wholly owned by Marathon Petroleum, in connection with stock repurchases authorized by its board in 2015 and 2016. (See this PubCo post.) Pursuant to that authorization, in 2018, Andeavor’s CEO had directed the legal department to establish a Rule 10b5-1 plan to repurchase company shares worth $250 million. At the time, however, Andeavor’s CEO was on the verge of meeting with the CEO of Marathon Petroleum to resume previously stalled negotiations on an acquisition of Andeavor at a substantial premium. After Andeavor’s legal department concluded that the company did not possess material nonpublic information about the acquisition, Andeavor went ahead with the stock repurchase. Rather than attempting to build a 10b-5 case based on a debatably defective 10b5-1 plan, the SEC opted instead to make its point with allegations that Andeavor had failed to maintain an effective system of internal control procedures in violation of Exchange Act Section 13(b)(2)(B). On Friday, the SEC posted the joint statement of SEC Commissioners Hester Peirce and Elad Roisman, who voted against the settled action, explaining the reasons for their dissents. In sum, they contend that, in the action, the SEC took an “unduly broad view of Section 13(b)(2)(B).”

Guidance under the gun

Once again, guidance is under the gun. In this recent speech, SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce expressed her concern for SEC staff guidance and interpretation that she seems to view as sometimes runaway or out-of-control and, sometimes, too much under the radar.  A few days later, the Acting Director of the Office of Management and Budget joined in, distributing a memo designed to limit rules and guidance that federal agencies issue, particularly outside of the notice-and-comment process. But potentially the most significant impact could result from an important case that SCOTUS is now considering (to be discussed in a separate post), which could undo the historic deference that courts have generally given to agency interpretations of their own regulations, often referred to as Auer deference. In this highly politicized environment, what will be the impact on staff guidance?