Tag: The Conference Board

The Conference Board reports on board diversity

The Conference Board has just released a new report, Corporate Board Practices in the Russell 3000, S&P 500, and S&P MidCap 400: 2021 Edition, a primary focus of which is board diversity. According to the press release, the study is the “most current and comprehensive review of board composition, director demographics, and governance practices at US public companies.”  Key to the study is that more companies are now actually disclosing the racial and ethnic composition of their boards (based on self-reporting by directors): companies providing data are up from 24% of the S&P 500 in 2020 to 59% in 2021, and from 7.7% of the Russell 3000 in 2020 to 26.9% in 2021. With regard to progress in board diversity, the data shows that women have made significant advances—on the Russell 3000 this year, women represented about 38% of this year’s newly elected class of directors, bringing total representation of women on Russell 3000 boards to 24.4%, up from 21.9% in 2020.  However, boards have significant catching up to do when it comes to racial and ethnic diversity. Based on self-reported data, “boards remain overwhelmingly white,” and, for 2021, the class of new directors was 78.3% white, with only 11.5% African-American, 6.5% Latinx/Hispanic and 3.1% Asian, Hawaiian or Pacific Islander.

The Conference Board shares insights on how to convey your “sustainability story”

How do companies tackle the assignment of conveying to their shareholders and other stakeholders how they approach sustainability—in a way that is accurate, clear and genuine and that does not sound like a confected facsimile of every other peer company?  That sounds like a challenging task.  To address that challenge, The Conference Board convened a working group of over 300 executives from more than 150 companies who met five times between July 2020 and May 2021 to share ideas about how companies can effectively “tell their sustainability stories.” The Board captured some of those ideas in this report.

The Conference Board surveys corporate PACs on suspension of political contributions

Issues regarding political donations have been thrown into sharp relief recently in light of the stands taken by a number of companies to pause or discontinue some or all political donations in response to the shocking events of January 6. A number of companies announced that their corporate PACs had suspended—temporarily or permanently—their contributions to one or both political parties or to lawmakers who objected to certification of the presidential election. But how widely adopted was this approach? To find out, The Conference Board conducted a survey. It turns out that those announcements reflected only a slice of the actions taken by corporate PACs. What’s more, the survey indicated that corporate boards typically had little role in these decisions. Nevertheless, for some companies, boards may find that political spending associated with their companies is front and center this proxy season.

Companies divided on impact of COVID-19 on sustainability efforts

What has been the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on companies’ sustainability efforts? On the one hand, as discussed in this article from the WSJ, C-suite occupants have been “trying to figure out what they’re willing to throw overboard as the economic storm spawned by the pandemic is swamping their ships. Businesses that were planning to help save the world are now simply saving themselves….History suggests this new [sustainability] paradigm is probably on the back burner.” Even BlackRock, which had previously announced that it was putting “sustainability at the center of [its] investment approach,” acknowledged in April, that “certain non-financial projects like sustainability reports had been ‘de-prioritized’ due to COVID-19. ‘We recognize that in the near-term companies may need to reallocate resources to address immediate priorities in these uncertain times.’ BlackRock’s report stated. BlackRock said it would ‘expect a return to companies focusing on material sustainability management and reporting in due course.’”

On the other hand, however, as this article from Financial Executives International observed, the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted “the very issues that have been driving ESG concerns—managing resources, sustainability, community impact and employee well-being.”  While it might have been “easy to assume the current crisis may permanently shift attention away from environmental, social and governance (ESG) concerns as management teams grapple with existential issues,” it turned out that “the very actions companies are taking will likely bring them closer to the multi-stakeholder, long-term value principles that lie at the heart of ESG.”  How are companies viewing the effects?